Tag Archives: Regulation

Opposite Regulation of Insulin Sensitivity by Dietary Lipid Versus Carbohydrate Excess

To understand the mechanisms in lipid-induced insulin resistance, a more physiological approach is to enhance fatty acid (FA) availability through the diet. Nine healthy men ingested two hypercaloric diets (in 75% excess of habitual caloric intake) for 3 days, enriched in unsaturated FA (78 energy % [E%] fat) (UNSAT) or carbohydrates (80 E% carbohydrate) (CHO) as well as a eucaloric control diet (CON). Compared with CON, the UNSAT diet reduced whole-body and leg glucose disposal during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, while decreasing hepatic glucose production. In muscle, diacylglycerol (DAG) and intramyocellular triacylglycerol were increased. The accumulated DAG was sn-1,3 DAG, which is known not to activate PKC, and insulin signaling was intact. UNSAT decreased PDH-E1α protein content and increased inhibitory PDH-E1α Ser300 phosphorylation and FA oxidation. CHO increased whole-body and leg insulin sensitivity, while increasing hepatic glucose production. After CHO, muscle PDH-E1α Ser300 phosphorylation was decreased, and glucose oxidation increased. After UNSAT, but not CHO, muscle glucose-6-phosphate content was 103% higher compared with CON during the clamp. Thus, PDH-E1α expression and covalent regulation, and hence the tricarboxylic acid cycle influx of pyruvate-derived acetyl-CoA relative to β-oxidation–derived acetyl-CoA, are suggested to impact on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Taken together, the oxidative metabolic fluxes of glucose and FA are powerful and opposite regulators of insulin action in muscle.

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Dual Regulation of Gluconeogenesis by Insulin and Glucose in the Proximal Tubules of the Kidney

Growing attention has been focused on the roles of the proximal tubules (PTs) of the kidney in glucose metabolism, including the mechanism of regulation of gluconeogenesis. In this study, we found that PT-specific insulin receptor substrate 1/2 double-knockout mice, established by using the newly generated sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2)-Cre transgenic mice, exhibited impaired insulin signaling and upregulated gluconeogenic gene expression and renal gluconeogenesis, resulting in systemic insulin resistance. In contrast, in streptozotocin-treated mice, although insulin action was impaired in the PTs, the gluconeogenic gene expression was unexpectedly downregulated in the renal cortex, which was restored by administration of an SGLT1/2 inhibitor. In the HK-2 cells, the gluconeogenic gene expression was suppressed by insulin, accompanied by phosphorylation and inactivation of forkhead box transcription factor 1 (FoxO1). In contrast, glucose deacetylated peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor coactivator 1-α (PGC1α), a coactivator of FoxO1, via sirtuin 1, suppressing the gluconeogenic gene expression, which was reversed by inhibition of glucose reabsorption. These data suggest that both insulin signaling and glucose reabsorption suppress the gluconeogenic gene expression by inactivation of FoxO1 and PGC1α, respectively, providing insight into novel mechanisms underlying the regulation of gluconeogenesis in the PTs.

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Indirect Regulation of Endogenous Glucose Production by Insulin: The Single Gateway Hypothesis Revisited

On the basis of studies that investigated the intraportal versus systemic insulin infusion and transendothelial transport of insulin, we proposed the “single gateway hypothesis,” which supposes an indirect regulation of hepatic glucose production by insulin; the rate-limiting transport of insulin across the adipose tissue capillaries is responsible for the slow suppression of free fatty acids (FFAs), which in turn is responsible for delayed suppression of hepatic endogenous glucose production (EGP) during insulin infusion. Preventing the fall in plasma FFAs during insulin infusion either by administering intralipids or by inhibiting adipose tissue lipolysis led to failure in EGP suppression, thus supporting our hypothesis. More recently, mice lacking hepatic Foxo1 in addition to Akt1 and Akt2 (L-AktFoxo1TKO), all required for insulin signaling, surprisingly showed normal glycemia. Inhibiting the fall of plasma FFAs in these mice prevented the suppression of EGP during a clamp, reaffirming that the site of insulin action to control EGP is extrahepatic. Measuring whole-body turnover rates of glucose and FFAs in L-AktFoxo1TKO mice also confirmed that hepatic EGP was regulated by insulin-mediated control of FFAs. The knockout mouse model in combination with sophisticated molecular techniques confirmed our physiological findings and the single gateway hypothesis.

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Response to Comment on Ussar et al. Regulation of Glucose Uptake and Enteroendocrine Function by the Intestinal Epithelial Insulin Receptor. Diabetes 2017;66:886-896

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Comment on Ussar et al. Regulation of Glucose Uptake and Enteroendocrine Function by the Intestinal Epithelial Insulin Receptor. Diabetes 2017;66:886-896

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Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 Could Improve Glucose Regulation and Insulin Sensitivity Through Its RGD Domain

Low circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) are associated with insulin resistance and predict the development of type 2 diabetes. IGFBP-1 can affect cellular functions independently of IGF binding through an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin-binding motif. Whether causal mechanisms underlie the favorable association of high IGFBP-1 levels with insulin sensitivity and whether these could be exploited therapeutically remain unexplored. We used recombinant IGFBP-1 and a synthetic RGD-containing hexapeptide in complementary in vitro signaling assays and in vivo metabolic profiling in obese mice to investigate the effects of IGFBP-1 and its RGD domain on insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and whole-body glucose regulation. The RGD integrin-binding domain of IGFBP-1, through integrin engagement, focal adhesion kinase, and integrin-linked kinase, enhanced insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in C2C12 myotubes and INS-1 832/13 pancreatic β-cells. Both acute administration and chronic infusion of an RGD synthetic peptide to obese C57BL/6 mice improved glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity. These favorable effects on metabolic homeostasis suggest that the RGD integrin-binding domain of IGFBP-1 may be a promising candidate for therapeutic development in the field of insulin resistance.

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Regulation of Glucose Handling by the Skeleton: Insights From Mouse and Human Studies

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Central Regulation of Glucose Metabolism in Humans: Fact or Fiction?

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PGC-1{alpha} Coordinates Mitochondrial Respiratory Capacity and Muscular Fatty Acid Uptake via Regulation of VEGF-B

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) B belongs to the VEGF family, but in contrast to VEGF-A, VEGF-B does not regulate blood vessel growth. Instead, VEGF-B controls endothelial fatty acid (FA) uptake and was identified as a target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The regulatory mechanisms controlling Vegfb expression have remained unidentified. We show that peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) together with estrogen-related receptor α (ERR-α) regulates expression of Vegfb. Mice overexpressing PGC-1α under the muscle creatine kinase promoter (MPGC-1αTG mice) displayed increased Vegfb expression, and this was accompanied by increased muscular lipid accumulation. Ablation of Vegfb in MPGC-1αTG mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) normalized glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. We suggest that VEGF-B is the missing link between PGC-1α overexpression and the development of the diabetes-like phenotype in HFD-fed MPGC-1αTG mice. The findings identify Vegfb as a novel gene regulated by the PGC-1α/ERR-α signaling pathway. Furthermore, the study highlights the role of PGC-1α as a master metabolic sensor that by regulating the expression levels of Vegfa and Vegfb coordinates blood vessel growth and FA uptake with mitochondrial FA oxidation.

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The Hypothalamic Melanocortin Pathway and the Regulation of Glucose Handling in the Kidney: A Sympathetic Look at Brain-Kidney Connection

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