Tag Archives: {beta}Cell

Pair Feeding, but Not Insulin, Phloridzin, or Rosiglitazone Treatment, Curtails Markers of {beta}-Cell Dedifferentiation in db/db Mice

β-Cell failure is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Among several cellular biological mechanisms of cellular dysfunction, we and others have recently proposed that dedifferentiation of β-cells can explain the slowly progressive onset and partial reversibility of β-cell failure. Accordingly, we provided evidence of such processes in humans and experimental animal models of insulin-resistant diabetes. In this study, we asked whether β-cell dedifferentiation can be prevented with diet or pharmacological treatment of diabetes. db/db mice, a widely used model of insulin-resistant diabetes and obesity, were either pair fed or treated with the Sglt inhibitor phloridzin, the insulin-sensitizer rosiglitazone, or insulin. All treatments were equally efficacious in reducing plasma glucose levels. Pair feeding and phloridzin also resulted in significant weight loss. However, pair feeding among the four treatments resulted in a reduction of β-cell dedifferentiation, as assessed by Foxo1 and Aldh1a3 immunohistochemistry. The effect of diet to partly restore β-cell function is consistent with data in human diabetes and provides another potential mechanism by which lifestyle changes act as an effective intervention against diabetes progression.

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Bait and Trap: Enriching Autoreactive T Cells With {beta}-Cell Antigen-Loading Biomaterial Scaffolds for Early Detection of Type 1 Diabetes

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Longitudinal Associations Between Ambient Air Pollution With Insulin Sensitivity, {beta}-Cell Function, and Adiposity in Los Angeles Latino Children

Evidence suggests that ambient air pollution (AAP) exposure may contribute to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to determine whether exposure to elevated concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 (PM2.5) had adverse effects on longitudinal measures of insulin sensitivity (SI), β-cell function, and obesity in children at high risk for developing diabetes. Overweight and obese Latino children (8–15 years; n = 314) were enrolled between 2001 and 2012 from Los Angeles, CA, and followed for an average of 3.4 years (SD 3.1 years). Linear mixed-effects models were fitted to assess relationships between AAP exposure and outcomes after adjusting for covariates including body fat percent. Higher NO2 and PM2.5 were associated with a faster decline in SI and a lower SI at age 18 years, independent of adiposity. NO2 exposure negatively affected β-cell function, evidenced by a faster decline in disposition index (DI) and a lower DI at age 18 years. Higher NO2 and PM2.5 exposures over follow-up were also associated with a higher BMI at age 18 years. AAP exposure may contribute to development of type 2 diabetes through direct effects on SI and β-cell function.

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Checks and Balances–The Limits of {beta}-Cell Endurance to ER Stress

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Adiponectin and {beta}-Cell Adaptation in Pregnancy

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Oxytocin Improves {beta}-Cell Responsivity and Glucose Tolerance in Healthy Men

In addition to its pivotal role in psychosocial behavior, the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin contributes to metabolic control by suppressing eating behavior. Its involvement in glucose homeostasis is less clear, although pilot experiments suggest that oxytocin improves glucose homeostasis. We assessed the effect of intranasal oxytocin (24 IU) administered to 29 healthy, fasted male subjects on glucose homeostasis measured by means of an oral glucose tolerance test. Parameters of glucose metabolism were analyzed according to the oral minimal model. Oxytocin attenuated the peak excursion of plasma glucose and augmented the early increases in insulin and C-peptide concentrations in response to the glucose challenge, while slightly blunting insulin and C-peptide peaks. Oral minimal model analyses revealed that oxytocin compared with placebo induced a pronounced increase in β-cell responsivity (PHItotal) that was largely due to an enhanced dynamic response (PHId), and a more than twofold improvement in glucose tolerance (disposition index). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, glucagon, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were not or were only marginally affected. These results indicate that oxytocin plays a significant role in the acute regulation of glucose metabolism in healthy humans and render the oxytocin system a potential target of antidiabetic treatment.

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Impact of Perturbed Pancreatic {beta}-Cell Cholesterol Homeostasis on Adipose Tissue and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism

Elevated pancreatic β-cell cholesterol levels impair insulin secretion and reduce plasma insulin levels. This study establishes that low plasma insulin levels have a detrimental effect on two major insulin target tissues: adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Mice with increased β-cell cholesterol levels were generated by conditional deletion of the ATP-binding cassette transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1, in β-cells (β-DKO mice). Insulin secretion was impaired in these mice under basal and high-glucose conditions, and glucose disposal was shifted from skeletal muscle to adipose tissue. The β-DKO mice also had increased body fat and adipose tissue macrophage content, elevated plasma interleukin-6 and MCP-1 levels, and decreased skeletal muscle mass. They were not, however, insulin resistant. The adipose tissue expansion and reduced skeletal muscle mass, but not the systemic inflammation or increased adipose tissue macrophage content, were reversed when plasma insulin levels were normalized by insulin supplementation. These studies identify a mechanism by which perturbation of β-cell cholesterol homeostasis and impaired insulin secretion increase adiposity, reduce skeletal muscle mass, and cause systemic inflammation. They further identify β-cell dysfunction as a potential therapeutic target in people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

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Type 2 Diabetes Genes Gleaned by Making a {beta}-Cell Screen Routine

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Comment on Alarcon et al. Pancreatic {beta}-Cell Adaptive Plasticity in Obesity Increases Insulin Production but Adversely Affects Secretory Function. Diabetes 2016;65:438-450

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The Genetic Landscape of {beta}-Cell Proliferation: Toward a Road Map

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