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Some Doubts About the Mantra on the Deleterious Cardiovascular Effects of Sulfonylureas

Diabetes Journal current issue





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How Should We Think About the Role of the Brain in Glucose Homeostasis and Diabetes?

Diabetes Journal current issue





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We Know More Than We Can Tell About Diabetes and Vascular Disease: The 2016 Edwin Bierman Award Lecture

The Edwin Bierman Award Lecture is presented in honor of the memory of Edwin L. Bierman, MD, an exemplary scientist, mentor, and leader in the field of diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis. The award and lecture recognizes a leading scientist in the field of macrovascular complications and contributing risk factors in diabetes. Clay F. Semenkovich, MD, the Irene E. and Michael M. Karl Professor and Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipid Research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, received the prestigious award at the American Diabetes Association’s 76th Scientific Sessions, 10–14 June 2016, in New Orleans, LA. He presented the Edwin Bierman Award Lecture, “We Know More Than We Can Tell About Diabetes and Vascular Disease,” on Sunday, 12 June 2016.

Diabetes is a disorder of abnormal lipid metabolism, a notion strongly supported by the work of Edwin Bierman, for whom this eponymous lecture is named. This abnormal lipid environment continues to be associated with devastating vascular complications in diabetes despite current therapies, suggesting that our understanding of the pathophysiology of blood vessel disease in diabetes is limited. In this review, potential new insights into the nature of diabetic vasculopathy will be discussed. Recent observations suggest that while the concept of distinct macrovascular and microvascular complications of diabetes has been useful, vascular diseases in diabetes may be more interrelated than previously appreciated. Moreover, the intermediary metabolic pathway of de novo lipogenesis, which synthesizes lipids from simple precursors, is robustly sensitive to insulin and may contribute to these complications. De novo lipogenesis requires fatty acid synthase, and recent studies of this enzyme suggest that endogenously produced lipids are channeled to specific intracellular sites to affect physiology. These findings raise the possibility that novel approaches to treating diabetes and its complications could be based on altering the intracellular lipid milieu.

Diabetes Journal current issue





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The Unraveling Truth About IRE1 and MicroRNAs in Diabetes

Diabetes Journal current issue





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About diabetes

Diabetes is having a devastating effect on the African American community. Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death in African Americans and African Americans’ death rates are twenty seven percent higher than whites.

Over 2.8 million African Americans have diabetes and one third of them don’t know they have the disease. In addition, twenty five percent of African Americans between the ages of 65 – 74 have diabetes and one in four African American women, over the age of 55, have been diagnosed with the disease

The cause of diabetes is a mystery, but researchers believe that both genetics and environmental factors play roles in who will develop the disease. . Heredity

Researchers believe that African Americans and African Immigrants are predisposed to developing diabetes. Research suggests that African Americans and recent African immigrants have inherited a “thrifty gene” from their African ancestors.

This gene may have enabled Africans to use food energy more efficiently during cycles of feast and famine. Now, with fewer cycles of feast and famine, this gene may make weight control more difficult for African Americans and African Immigrants.

This genetic predisposition, coupled with impaired glucose tolerance, is often associated with the genetic tendency toward high blood pressure. People with impaired glucose tolerance have higher than normal blood glucose levels and are at a higher risk for developing diabetes. What is Diabetes?

Diabetes, commonly know as “sugar diabetes”, is a condition that occurs when the body is unable to properly produce or use insulin. Insulin is needed by the body to process sugar, starches and other foods into energy. Diabetes is a chronic condition for which there is no known cure; diabetes is a serious disease and should not be ignored.

Diabetics often suffer from low glucose levels (sugar) in their blood. Low blood sugar levels can make you disorientated, dizzy, sweaty, hungry, have headaches, have sudden mood swings, have difficulty paying attention, or have tingling sensations around the mouth.

Types of Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a condition that occurs when a person’s blood glucose levels is higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of type II diabetes. Pre-diabetes can cause damage to the heart and circulatory system, but pre-diabetes can often be controlled by controlling blood glucose levels. By controlling pre-diabetes you can often prevent or delay the onset of Type II diabetes.

Type I or juvenile-onset diabetes usually strikes people under the age of 20, but can strike at any age. Five to ten percent of African Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes are diagnosed with this type of the disease. Type I diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the body produces little or no insulin and this type of diabetes must be treated with daily insulin injections.

Type II or adult onset diabetes is responsible for ninety to ninety-fivepercent of diagnosed diabetes cases in African Americans. Type II results from a condition where the body fails to properly use insulin. According to the American Diabetes Association, “Type II is usually found in people over 45, who have diabetes in their family, who are overweight, who don’t exercise and who have cholesterol problems.” In the early stages it can often be controlled with lifestyle changes, but in the later stages diabetic pills or insulin injections are often needed.





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